Cybersecurity Blog

Scammers use subscription renewals to trick you into downloading malware – 08/03-21

 

 

A social engineering tactic dubbed Bazacall is making a resurgence. This attack method first appeared in March, 2021. It starts with an email that arrives in your inbox. They use a variety of scenarios, however all encourage you to phone a number to resolve an issue. Their favorites appear to be notifying you that a subscription is going to be renewed or that a free trial is over. Details on the nature of that subscription are often left out, making it more likely that you will call to clear things up.

When you call, the “customer service rep” on the phone directs you to a very realistic website. Sometimes these websites are spoofed sites of real businesses, other times the businesses are completely fictitious. Once you are at the website they walk you through the steps to cancel the subscription, telling you what to click. Everything seems perfectly legitimate until you reach the final step. The last click on the website opens an Excel file that asks you to enable Macros.  If you continue to follow the instructions of the “rep”, the malware is downloaded and installed on your computer. The type of malware varies but typically they give remote access to your machine, allowing the attackers to gain access to to other devices on the network.

This phishing attack method is particularly dangerous as the email doesn’t contain any attachments or links which allows it to pass through inbox filters. In addition when you open it, it looks official and innocent. After all what can happen if you just call to cancel a subscription that you don’t want? However once you call, the “rep” is very good at social engineering. He or she develops trust and insists that this is the only way to ensure the charge doesn’t appear on your credit card.

The best way to defend yourself against this type of attack is to recognize that emails with vague information about a subscription being renewed are malicious. Thankfully with this attack you have a second chance to defend yourself. You can refuse to enable Macros when asked.  Remember to use your common sense and don’t let yourself be bullied. There is no justification for enabling Excel Macros to cancel a subscription.  If it doesn’t make sense, hang up.

 

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