Bissett Insider

Bissett professor Matthew McLarnon has research articles published

Congratulations to Bissett faculty member, Matthew McLarnon for his recent research publications. Matthew is a professor in the General Management and Human Resources Department at Bissett School of Business.

Matthew’s article was recently published in the top ranking Journal of Applied Psychology,  and titled, Challenging the “static” quo: Trajectories of engagement in team processes toward a deadline. Larson, N. L., McLarnon, M. J. W., & O’Neill, T. A. (in press)

Abstract:  Although team effectiveness research has advanced our understanding of team processes, much of this research has been based on static methodologies, despite the recognition that team processes change over time. Thus, the purpose of this article is to advance the team dynamics literature by developing and testing a theoretical account of team engagement in processes toward a deadline. We theorize about team process trajectories, which we suggest is the form of process change over time (i.e., pattern of increase/decrease). Further, we identify a key driver of process trajectories and consider the implications of trajectories for team performance. Results from a series of linear multilevel latent growth models suggested that teams’ engagement in strategy and planning, monitoring goal progress, and cooperative conflict management (cf. Marks, Mathieu, & Zaccaro, 2001) increased over time toward a deadline, and that steeper increases tended to be positively related to team performance. Finally, achievement-striving was found to be an important within-team factor driving team-specific process trajectories and was indirectly related to performance. This study provides new theoretical insights with respect to how teams engage in processes toward a deadline, along with team achievement-striving as a compositional input, and the performance implications of team process trajectories.

Matthew’s second article: Resiliency, self-regulation, and reemployment after job lossJournal of Employment Counseling. McLarnon, M. J. W., Rothstein, M. G., & King, G. A. (in press).

Abstract:  This study investigated self-regulation and resiliency in the search for reemployment. Although trait-based approaches are central to many resiliency conceptualizations, recent research has found that self-regulation (affective, behavioral, and cognitive) contributes to predicting resiliency-related outcomes. We hypothesized that self-regulation increments prediction of reemployment process outcomes, specifically the job search outcomes of psychological well-being, job search self-efficacy, and job search clarity. Results indicated that, over and above resiliency traits, behavioral and cognitive self-regulation incrementally predicted well-being and job search clarity, and cognitive self-regulation incrementally predicted job search self-efficacy. Implications for theory and continued research on resiliency in reemployment are discussed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *