Bissett Insider

Bissett professor Matthew McLarnon has research articles published

Congratulations to Bissett faculty member, Matthew McLarnon for his recent research publications. Matthew is a professor in the General Management and Human Resources Department at Bissett School of Business.

Matthew’s article was recently published in the top ranking Journal of Applied Psychology,  and titled, Challenging the “static” quo: Trajectories of engagement in team processes toward a deadline. Larson, N. L., McLarnon, M. J. W., & O’Neill, T. A. (in press)

Abstract:  Although team effectiveness research has advanced our understanding of team processes, much of this research has been based on static methodologies, despite the recognition that team processes change over time. Thus, the purpose of this article is to advance the team dynamics literature by developing and testing a theoretical account of team engagement in processes toward a deadline. We theorize about team process trajectories, which we suggest is the form of process change over time (i.e., pattern of increase/decrease). Further, we identify a key driver of process trajectories and consider the implications of trajectories for team performance. Results from a series of linear multilevel latent growth models suggested that teams’ engagement in strategy and planning, monitoring goal progress, and cooperative conflict management (cf. Marks, Mathieu, & Zaccaro, 2001) increased over time toward a deadline, and that steeper increases tended to be positively related to team performance. Finally, achievement-striving was found to be an important within-team factor driving team-specific process trajectories and was indirectly related to performance. This study provides new theoretical insights with respect to how teams engage in processes toward a deadline, along with team achievement-striving as a compositional input, and the performance implications of team process trajectories.

Matthew’s second article: Resiliency, self-regulation, and reemployment after job lossJournal of Employment Counseling. McLarnon, M. J. W., Rothstein, M. G., & King, G. A. (in press).

Abstract:  This study investigated self-regulation and resiliency in the search for reemployment. Although trait-based approaches are central to many resiliency conceptualizations, recent research has found that self-regulation (affective, behavioral, and cognitive) contributes to predicting resiliency-related outcomes. We hypothesized that self-regulation increments prediction of reemployment process outcomes, specifically the job search outcomes of psychological well-being, job search self-efficacy, and job search clarity. Results indicated that, over and above resiliency traits, behavioral and cognitive self-regulation incrementally predicted well-being and job search clarity, and cognitive self-regulation incrementally predicted job search self-efficacy. Implications for theory and continued research on resiliency in reemployment are discussed.

Bissett finance professor, Tashfeen Hussain has research papers accepted for publication

Congratulations to Tashfeen Hussain,PhD, for having his research recognized. The first paper titled, Total productivity and cost efficiency dynamics of US merging banks:  a non-parametric approach (Jaml Ali, PhD;  Nacuer Essadam, PhD,  and Tashfeen Hussain, PhD), has been accepted to the Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance.

Abstract:   This paper investigates the productivity characteristics and cost efficiency dynamics of US acquiring banks over the period from 1992 to 2003. The findings show that large merging banks tend to have the same productivity scores compared to their peer banks. Small merging banks, on the other hand, experienced lower productivity than their peers. The source of the acquirers’ productivity seems to be the efficiency change rather than the frontier shift. Cost efficiency results show that small and large merging banks maintained higher cost efficiencies over their peers for the whole period motivated by higher technical efficiency scores, meaning that the large acquirers’ ability to maximize their outputs given fixed inputs is best relative to merging and non-merging banks of different sizes. The principal component analysis of the cost efficiency sub-components indicate that the merging banks principal cost efficiency components are mainly of technical and pure technical efficiencies but after the merger, allocative efficiency increased substantially at the expense of technical and pure technical efficiencies, while the peer banks cost efficiency remained totally dependent on technical and pure technical efficiencies.

Also, Tashfeen has recently presented his working paper, titled, Do credit default swaps impact lenders’ monitoring of loans? at the Academy of Economics and Finance Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, earlier this month. Tashfeen received FDC funding to attend the conference.

Congratulations Tashfeen, the faculty looks forward to more of your research.

Bissett professor, Uthpala Tennakoon has chapter published and receives research grant

Congratulations to Bissett HR professor, Uthpala Tennakoon, PhD, on the recent publication of a chapter titled, Ideal Organizations for the New Ideal Workers: Exploring the Role of Life-friendly work practices in the book, The New Ideal Worker. Contributions to Management Science. (Edited by las Heras Maestro M., Chinchilla Albiol N., Grau Grau M.)

Abstract:The increased interest of modern employees to balance competing demands between work and life has driven organizations to rethink the profile of the ideal worker. Life-friendly work practices (LFWP), which commonly include flexible work arrangements, compressed work weeks, teleworking, job sharing, family leave programs, organizational support for dependent care, and other life-related benefits, have evolved as a means to create workplaces which appeals to this new breed of workers. With limited resources at their disposal, it is important for organizations to be intentional about the selection and offering of LFWP. This interview study with 16 HR executives and 16 post-secondary university students as future employees, explores the organizational reasoning behind LFWP and future employee attraction criteria in relation to LFWP. The findings reveal that most organizations are genuinely interested in creating an ideal organization for their ideal employees. It may be beneficial for organizations to be more expressive of the organizational LFWP initiatives in their employer branding message to create awareness and attract the future ideal workers. The multi-perspective examination of LFWP provided useful insights for practical applications, and directions for further research.

Also, the faculty extends their congratulations to Uthpala for receiving a research grant from the Institute for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in the in the 2020 Essential Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Grants competition for the project titled, “Pop Quiz with a twist: Assessing the Benefits of two-stage in-class quizzes in business courses”.

 

Chair and finance professor, Reza Chowdhury has papers accepted for publication

Congratulations to Accounting and Finance, Chair and professor,  Reza Chowdhury, PhD, on having  his finance research recognized:
The first publication is titled,  Accessibility to External Finance and Entrepreneurship: A Cross-Country Analysis from the Informal Institutional Perspective. Reza H. Chowdhury and Min Maung (University of Saskatchewan), in the Journal of Small Business Management (2020)

Abstract: By using individual-level survey data from 97 countries, we investigate the effect of informal institutions on external financing and its impact on entrepreneurship. We find that a culturally-driven entrepreneurial environment allows entrepreneurs to obtain more debt, equity, and venture capital financing, and this, in turn, increases entrepreneurial activities. We further find that a culturally-driven entrepreneurial environment is more critical in determining entrepreneurship than formal institutional arrangements (such as investor protection). Our results provide evidence that cross-country variations in entrepreneurship can be explained by differences in cultural support to new venture financing across countries.

Brand and Firm Values in Distinct National Cultures, Reza H. Chowdhury, Wootae Chun (UNBC), Sungchul Choi (UNBC) and Kurtis Friend (Scotia Bank) in the Journal, Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics (2019)

Abstract: The objective of this article is to investigate the moderating role of national-based cultural attributes in the relationship between brand value and firm value. This article examines the topic in the context of different national cultural dimensions, including individualism, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, power distance, and long-term orientation. We use brand values of the Financial Times’s Global 500 companies and national cultural values reported by Hofstede, GLOBE, and Schwartz. Results exhibit that brands are more value-additive to companies in highly individualistic cultures. In addition, a valuable brand contributes more to firm value in low uncertainty avoidant, high masculine, low power distant, and short-term oriented cultures.National cultural attributes are therefore important determinants in explaining the magnitude by which highly valued brands contribute to the firm value of the companies that own the respective brands. The evidence suggests that while a valuable brand contributes to firm value, the level of its effect on firm value varies by distinctive characteristics of each national cultural dimension.

Congratulations Reza, we look forward to more research!

Bissett professor, Collette Lemieux, successfully defends her doctoral thesis

Bissett School of Business would like to extend congratulations to Assistant Professor, Collette Lemieux on successfully defending her doctoral thesis through the University of Calgary. Collette’s area of study was Education with a specialization in Adult learning and Mathematics Education. Collette is currently teaching Statistics in our faculty. Congratulations Collette!

The Abstract for Collette’s Thesis: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of an intervention, which uses stories to explore statistics, on post-secondary students’ understanding of statistics and their beliefs about the usefulness of statistics, and what features of the stories support meaningful learning.

            A qualitative case study approach was used. In line with the case study approach, multiple data sources were used, which consisted of student and instructor class artefacts, pre- and post-intervention written response items, and post-intervention interviews. The participants in the study were 20 students from a single first-year post-secondary business statistics course in which the intervention was implemented. Data analysis entailed a thematic approach based primarily on open-coding to identify participants’ understanding of statistics, their beliefs about the usefulness of statistics, and what features of the intervention supported meaningful learning.

            The findings suggest that the intervention supported participants development of various types of understanding of selected topics in statistics, development of understanding of the usefulness of statistics, and personalization knowledge as part of the process of developing understanding. Further, the findings indicate that the intervention served to support positive beliefs about the usefulness of statistics. Finally, the findings suggest that the features of the intervention and, in particular, the stories that impacted meaningful learning included the prompts embedded within the stories, the authentic real-world context presented in the stories, and the nature of the characters introduced in the stories. 

Bissett professor Rajbir Bhatti appointed as grant reviewer by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

 Bissett School of Business wishes to congratulate Bissett  Associate Professor, Rajbir Bhatti on being appointed as a Grant Reviewer for the  second  year in succession, by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). Rajbir will be reviewing applications made to a joint initiative application to the College and Community Innovation Program (CCI) – IE and Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI).  The College and Community Innovation (CCI) Program is managed by NSERC in collaboration with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) participates in the Innovation Enhancement (IE) Grants component of the granting agencies’ College and Community Innovation (CCI) Program in order to foster partnerships between colleges and the private sector that will lead to business innovation at the local, regional and national levels. This joint initiative allows colleges to apply for a comprehensive funding package supporting both research costs and research infrastructure (through the CFI’s new College-Industry Innovation Fund

IE Grants stimulate applied research that brings together necessary expertise from diverse fields such as natural sciences and engineering, social sciences and humanities, and/or health sciences to address business-driven challenges and opportunities. IE Grants provide funding to colleges on a competitive basis to support the growth of their applied research capacity leading to collaborative applied research and technology transfer activities with and to the benefit of companies—SMEs in particular. They thus increase company engagements and contributions throughout the term of the grant. These grants will focus on an area where the college has recognized expertise and that meets local or regional needs and where there is the potential to increase the economic development of the community.

The funding limit for these grants is $400,000 per year, (payable for five years) – capped at $2 million per application.

Bissett professor Nicole Edge has paper accepted at the Qualitative Accounting Research Symposium

Bissett school of Business would like to congratulate  Assistant Professor, Nicole Edge for having her paper titled: “The Goffman Gospel According to Accounting: Maintaining Business Beliefs” accepted for the Qualitative Accounting Research Symposium sponsored by the Canadian Academic Accounting Association.

The Symposium, taking place November 28 – 29, at the University of Guelph, “brings together researchers and accounting faculty who share an interest in qualitative accounting research from diverse methodological and theoretical perspectives”.

Bissett Associate Professor, Paul Varella presents paper at conference in St. Petersburg at the GSOM Emerging Markets Conference

Bissett School of Business would like to congratulate Associate Professor, Paul Varella on the acceptance and presentation of his paper titled:  Institutionalization of External Environmental Governance of Firms a Microfoundation Study.

Abstract:
This paper introduces a qualitative study that investigates microfoundational processes for
external green governance of corporations, societal external governance onto firms for
issues associated with the natural environment. The study investigates the agency of
professionals working in corporations and eNGOs and the related social structures
associated with green governance. We then evaluate, through a series of propositions, how
agency and social structures recursively overtime help shape the institutions aimed at
governing corporate sustainability. The content analysis of the interviews with 24 senior
level professionals in this study offers additional insights to how agency and social
structures interface, as institutions evolve into establishing different governing approaches
to corporate action with sustainability relevance. The study is relevant to help understand
institutionalization processes related to the natural environment, which is a critical aspect
to the sustainable growth of economies of emerging markets.

The presentation was on the topic of Business in Society: a Change of Paradigm. That conference track was organized by the Graduate School of Management (GSOM) of St. Petersburg University, on October 4, 2019. The conference was organized by GSOM in cooperation with the Academy of Business and Society (ABIS).

The related research is funded by the Institute of Environmental Sustainability at MRU.

Bissett professor Jim Fischer busy mentoring students in the annual Stock Market Competition and with his research projects

The academic year is always an exciting time of year for finance students as the much anticipated Annual Bissett Stock Market Competition is well underway! The 14th edition of the annual competition has thirteen teams of three competing for the right to have their names added to the revered trophy which resides in the Bissett office. Teams have until the end of March to test themselves in both Canadian and US stock markets. With a variety of strategies in play, including buy-and-hold, frequent trading, and the inclusion of options and margin in the mix, it is shaping up to be an exciting time for participants. This is another great example of how Bissett School of Business offers students impactful learning opportunities through experiential opportunities. Thanks for your leadership Jim!
In terms of his research endeavors, Jim Fischer was in Minneapolis during reading week to present his paper “Modern Portfolio Theory and the Efficient Markets Hypothesis: How Well Did They Serve Canada’s Baby-boom Generation? to the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Financial Services. The meeting is held annually in conjunction with the Annual Conference of the Financial Planning Association, attracting a large number of academics as well as industry practitioners.
Abstract: Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) and the Efficient Markets Hypothesis (EMH) have influenced portfolio management strategies for an entire generation. Taking the example of an average Canadian family from 1977 to 2016, this paper examines how well MPT and EMH served the baby-boom generation of investors. A model investing strategy was constructed based on the principles of MPT and EMH. The strategy was evaluated for its ability to adequately provide for the subject couple in retirement. Results of this portfolio were compared to other popular investment alternatives. Using generally-accepted rules-of-thumb in financial planning, the MPT strategy was found to have provided an adequate retirement income for the subject couple. Some of the other strategies moderately exceeded the returns of the MPT strategy, while others under performed this benchmark. Analysis of these discrepancies reinforced the significance of diversification and of re-balancing portfolios through dynamic asset allocation.

Bissett professors Mohammed El Hazzouri and Leah Hamilton have papers published

Congratulations to Associate Professors Mohammed El Hazzouri and Leah Hamilton for having their paper published in the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing,  titled: “Why Us?! How Members of Minority Groups React to Public Health Advertisements Featuring Their Own Group”.  The research press release was published in The Conversation Canada and several other venues.