Cybersecurity Blog

Coronavirus based attacks are rampant – 03/19/20

 

As employees all over the world are working from home,  criminals are ramping things up hoping to take advantage of the less secure networks that people tend to have at home. We have surges in phishing emails on campus and across the world related to working from home as well as an increase in malicious websites.  It has gotten so bad the US Secret Service has issued a warning. Here are some things to watch out for.

The fake VPN

As employees struggle to setup a home office, they are signing up and downloading VPN services at record rates. While all of our employees have the advantage of using SRAS, many smaller organizations do not have their own VPN tool and are asking employees to install one on their home computer. If your spouse or roommate are in this situation, warn them to be very careful about what VPN they download. Cyberattackers are offering fake VPN services that download malware onto your machine in record numbers. Make sure they check reviews of the service to ensure it is reputable before they install it on their machine.

Fake COVID-19 trackers

As people attempt to live their lives and stay safe, many are turning to maps that track the location and incidence of infections. Criminals are getting wise and creating their own versions of these tracking websites that infect your computer with malware.

Some enterprising scammers have also created phone apps that supposedly track the infection rate  but load your device with ransomware instead. Stick to well known and reputable websites such as Alberta Health Services and the World Health Organization to get your information about the virus and stay away from any apps related to it including ones that tell you how to get rid of it.

Phishing emails about working from home and COVID-19

Phishing email attacks are off the scale. Everything from fake emails from your organization about working from home, to offers of vaccines and cures.  One of their favorites is fake GoFundMe pages with coronavirus victims pleading for medical help.   Another is pretending to be a colleague who is quarantined and needs help.

You name it, the depraved are going to try it. During this time it is especially important to be vigilant. If you receive an email that doesn’t come from a Mount Royal email address, question its validity. While you are working at home, make sure you use your Mount Royal email address to send business correspondence. DO NOT use your personal email address. This will make it easier for your colleagues to stay safe.

 

Sources:

https://www.securityweek.com/researchers-track-coronavirus-themed-cyberattacks
https://www.securityweek.com/other-virus-threat-surge-covid-themed-cyberattacks

How to prevent a two factor authentication compromise – 03/04/20

 

 

This week I posted an article telling the horrific tale of a Mount Royal employee who had their phone number ported to another carrier and their email compromised even though they had two factor authentication enabled on their email account.

How was this possible? The authentication method that they had used was an SMS message sent to their phone.  With this method, who ever has control over the phone number receives the authentication codes. The bad news is, if someone impersonates you and either asks for a new SIM card or moves your number to a different carrier they can get access to your email account.  The good news is, there is a way to stop this.

Instead of using a text message sent to your phone as your second step, use an authenticator app or authenticator key. An authenticator app generates an authentication code using wifi, while an authenticator key must be plugged in or waved near a device for you to login.  In both cases you have to be in physical possession of the second factor to get access to your account. Of course if your phone is stolen or your key is lost, you are locked out.  However you can print off backup codes and have an extra key available in case that happens.

 

Identity theft in 2020: Everyone is a target (a MRU employee tells their story) – 03/04/20

 

 

As coordinator of the cybersecurity awareness program here at MRU, I often have colleagues call me with their own personal tales of horror. One of the more recent ones involved a Port-out-scam. Here is a their tale, written in their own words…

 

Until recently, identity theft was definitely something that we never thought could happen to us. It’s something that we warned our grandparents, our parents and even our security-relaxed friends about. But we were totally safe, or so we thought.

Through this experience our lives have definitely changed forever. We have learned a great deal and are now more aware, and will be more vigilant. It was shocking to discover how easy it might be to lose everything. 

Upon landing at the airport in Calgary at 2 AM  following a holiday early in January, my boyfriend (for privacy we will call him James) turned his phone on to discover that he had no carrier service. We didn’t think it would be anything serious and joked about something being wrong with his last payment. 

The next morning James called Telus and a Customer Service Agent informed him that he had ported his number out to Bell on Tuesday, to which he quickly replied that he had been out of the country, so that was impossible. After some convincing that this action was not taken by James, Telus quickly, and easily, ported the number back from Bell. We knew at this point that something was very wrong. He was also unable to get into his Microsoft Outlook email account; his password was denied.

Once James had his number back, he was able to use his phone (with SMS two-step authentication) to reset his password and get into his email accounts, where we quickly realized the horrifying truth that his identity was compromised. Someone had accessed his email account with his phone number, changed the password, and taken over.  James’s email account is connected to everything: PayPal, Amazon, personal & joint banking, investments, taxes, etcetera. I am sure you can imagine the anxiety James and I felt in that moment of realization.

You’re probably thinking that James did something to be a target. He must have been lenient with his security questions, or displayed some weakness with online purchases or social media. We have gone over everything meticulously to try to figure this out, and with the help of many people, our conclusion is that he actually did nothing wrong. All the hackers needed to access his email was his phone number. He is not a prominent person and does not hold a prominent position, so not your typical target according to experts. Further, he is very private and careful, with the strongest security settings on his social media accounts where he is also conscious about everything he posts, and any business he does online shopping with.

Next came the long process of regaining control…. cancelling credit cards, bank accounts, informing all business and friends of the identity theft…setting up security watches on James’ Social Insurance Number through various government services…..hours of waiting on hold, explaining the situation and the frustrating experience of having to convince people of the seriousness of the situation.

We talked to Calgary Police Service (CPS), and while they made some good suggestions of things to change, credit checks to put in place, it was also frustrating that there was nothing they could do. Because no physical property was actually taken there will not be an investigation. We were also informed that we should maintain a close eye on all of James’ accounts for at least six to eight years as we don’t truly know what information the hackers obtained and they may resurface at a later date. 

Microsoft Outlook support was useless because the same security measures that should help in this situation caused serious issues. The hackers were able to change the security settings in the account before James got it back. They added their own email addresses and phone numbers as new two-factor authentication security. It is part of the Microsoft Outlook security plan that when changes are made there is a 30-day freeze before further changes can occur. Despite hours speaking with Microsoft Outlook staff at all levels, they refused to close the accounts before the 30-day freeze.

Through all of this we learned that this is called a Port-out Scam. In this case, Telus confirmed to James that his account number was provided to Bell in the port. There was an incredible lack of due-diligence to verify one’s identity in this case. This type of scam has been known to play on the emotions of customer service agents at telecommunications companies and the lack of security measures in place to protect customers. 

How does it work? The hacker would have acquired James’s name and phone number from somewhere to start – not difficult given the world we live in. Next they might have called Telus, pretending to be James, claiming they want to make a payment on their account, but they are not at home and didn’t have their account number – can they have it? The customer service agent should refuse, or ask detailed security questions only James can answer, but instead they provide the number. (CPS told us that hackers can also get addresses, email addresses and more this way) Next, armed with everything they need, they simply call another company (Bell in this case) and pretend to be James, saying they want to port their number over from Telus. Just like that the hacker owns your number and now they can get into anything your number is tied to for two-step authentication. 

James called Bell to inform them of the theft and that they were used in the process of the theft, and, surprisingly, they brushed him off. Told him it was not their problem. Wanting to understand how this could possibly happen, I called Bell to casually inquire about moving over from my existing carrier and told the customer service agent I wanted to keep my phone number. She was more than happy to assure me it was no problem to keep my number – all I needed was my number, and to ensure my account with my previous carrier was in ‘good standing.’ It was way too easy. 

The comical part in this experience is that while it was so easy for the hacker to steal James’s number, in order to cancel his phone number (once he got it back) the Telus Customer Service Agent’s protocol was to hang up and call James back to verify that it was his number, as well as asking for detailed account information and his driver’s licence number. This means that there is protocol that exists, but no assurance that it is followed regularly.

We are sharing this story as we hope that others will learn from this. We want telecommunications companies to start  taking security seriously and we want you to be vigilant. Instead of assuming you are taking precautions and you are safe from identity theft, in 2020 it is safer to assume you are a target and take precautions for the day you will be attacked. 

Mystery Blogger
(MRU Employee)

 

Is there a way to use 2FA that will provide security even if you are a victim of a port-out or SiM swap scam? Yes there is. Read How to prevent a two factor authentication  compromise to find out.

 

Beware of tutors posing as MRU professors – 01/28/20

 

 

One of our students gets the cybersecurity hero of the month award.  This very sharp and vigilant student posted a Kijiji ad looking for a tutor. He received a response from a gentleman claiming he was a professor at Mount Royal University. Rather than take the man at his word, the student wisely made inquires first with his department chair and then with others. No one could vouch for his employment past or present.

Bravo to this smart young man for checking the perspective tutor’s credentials! Because he took the time to check for references and confirm that the person is who they said they were, he avoided paying a premium price for a not so premium tutor.

Well done!

 

SIN number scammers calling MRU employees – 10/25/19

 

 

Mount Royal employees are receiving fraudulent calls from individuals pretending to be from the Canadian government. The caller explains there is an issue with your SIN number and as a result you are subject to legal action. You are asked to contact them immediately.  Upon contacting them, you are told you must pay thousands in bitcoin to avoid being charged with fraud. This scam is similar to one currently making the rounds in Regina.

What makes this scam so concerning is the fraudsters are spoofing government agencies so the call looks like it is official.  As well they are often robocalls which makes them sound even more legitimate. In response, the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre has issued an alert asking people to be vigilant.

No government of Canada agency will call you over the phone and threaten you or ask for payment. Neither will the RCMP or police. If you receive a call of this nature, hang up the phone. If you are concerned there may be an issue with your SIN you can contact the government directly by visiting their website. You can also check with Equifax and Transunion to see if your SIN has been used to obtain additional credit without your knowledge.

 

Banks blaming customers for etransfer fraud. Here is how to protect yourself – 09/26/19

 

 

When a Manitoba man tried to etransfer his contractor, the money ended up in a criminals account instead.  When he discovered the fraud, he thought he was protected. However, he was shocked when his bank informed him that he was to blame and he wouldn’t be compensated for the loss. The reason? The answer to the security question he chose could be found on Facebook.  As far as the bank was concerned, he had not taken adequate steps to secure the etransfer and therefore they were not liable for the loss.

How did his etransfer get intercepted and deposited into a criminal’s account instead of his contractor’s? The contractor’s email had been compromised without his knowledge. Once the fraudsters had access to his email, they simply waited until an email with an etransfer link showed up in the inbox and clicked on it. The story would have ended there if the answer to the security question had been more challenging. Unfortunately, the man chose to use the name of the contractor’s wife. A quick check on Facebook gave the answer to the criminals who swiftly moved the money into their account.

After months of battling with the bank and with the help of the RCMP,  the man eventually recovered his money.  However he was one of the lucky ones. Most victims never see their money again.

How do you prevent this from happening to you? First, when sending an etransfer choose to send it by phone instead of email. Unencrypted text messages can be intercepted but it requires a lot more effort than stealing someone’s email . Second, make sure the answer to your security question isn’t easy to guess or find.  Our man from Manitoba would have avoided months of aggravation if he had told the contractor that the answer to the security question was Saskatchewan and not the actual name of his wife.  Lastly make sure you use a security question. Removing that step makes life easier for people, but it leaves them exposed to possible fraud.

 

 

MRU employees receiving email requests over the phone – 08/23/19

 

 

This week several employees reported receiving calls from someone claiming to be from Adobe asking them if they wished to receive emailed documents about their products.  Those who reported the calls declined, so I can’t say if the calls were legitimate sales calls from Adobe or if they were pretexting calls.  Regardless of which they were, agreeing to be emailed documents usually doesn’t end well.

If the calls are legitimate sales calls, you could be agreeing to receiving hundreds of spam emails.  If they are pretexting calls, the email they send you could have malware attached to it or contain a link to a webpage spoofing a legitimate site designed to steal your login credentials.  To add to the misery, they could then take any information that you have given them over the phone and use it to create additional phishing emails that are almost impossible to detect.

Unfortunately this is the second time that we have had these type of calls on campus. As pretexting is on the rise, I suspect we are going to see a lot more of them in the coming months. This is a gentle reminder to be alert if someone calls you asking you for information they should already have or asks for personal information they shouldn’t know.

If it is a sales call and you are interested in their services, hang up the phone and call the company using a phone number listed on their official website.  If it is from an organization that you know, hang up and call them directly using a phone number you know is legitimate.  Never call them back on a phone number they give you.

 

Watch out for fake Equifax settlement emails – 08/01/19

 

 

 

Cybercriminals are sending out fake Equifax settlement emails. These emails are promising free credit monitoring and/or compensation. To make matters worse, they are spoofing the real Equifax settlement page. So if you click on the link in the email, you are sent to a very convincing web page encouraging you to file a claim. Of course, if you fill in their form with all of your personal information you are just sending your data to the criminals.

If you need to file a claim, do so by visiting the FTC website. You can find information there about the data breach and the settlement as well as a legitimate link to the Equifax site.  Do not click on any links in any email that appears to come from Equifax. Visit their site directly using a browser search result or a bookmark. Everything that you need to know you should be able to find there. If not, there will be legitimate contact information you can safely use.

 

Scammers targeting MRU are getting very creative – 07/17/19

In September last year, the first of several targeted email scams arrived in Mount Royal inboxes. Since that time we have see a plethora of these scams spread across campus.  Up to now that have all  been emails from a supervisor asking a report to do a favor for them.

However, we must have ended up on some “the Best People to Scam” list as this week the scams have gotten very creative. First up is a dude in Indonesia contacting Wellness Services to help him sell a helicopter (I actually think this might be legit).  Second up is  an email to the MRFA insisting a charge from their store has appeared on a bank statement (definitely not legit).  Check out the pics!!

 

As entertaining as these emails are, that is not the reason why I am sharing them with you (well maybe a little bit). I am sharing them to give you a heads ups that MRU is being actively targeted and we all need to be on our toes. If you receive any email that is out of the ordinary, please take a closer look at it. If you aren’t sure if it is malicious, forward it to abuse@mtroyal.ca like your colleagues did and we can take a look. Everyone who reports an email gets a cool sticker. Be a superhero and report those malicious emails!

 

Must Read – MRU impersonators are spoofing real email addresses 07/03/19

The newest round of MRU impersonators are upping their game. The are now  spoofing legitimate email addresses. To do this, they accessed the source code of the email and changed its header information.  As a result, the displayed sender email address and sender’s name match and are correct. However, any replies to the email are sent to a different email address all together. Take a look.

 

 

Not only did they spoof the email address, but they also included the employees’ email signature. This makes it very hard to determine if the email is legitimate or not.

How do you protect yourself against this type of cyberattack? Easy,  do what your colleagues  did. Call the person who sent the unexpected email to verify that they actually sent it. By making that call, you not only protect yourself but also the person being impersonated.  Without it they have no way of knowing their email account may have been compromised.

To all of you who forwarded the email to abuse@mtroyal.ca, thank you!!  You are superheros! Don’t miss your chance to be a superhero, forward malicious emails to abuse@mtroyal.ca.